9 Out of the Top 10 Traits Men and Women Want In a Romantic Partner are the Same

9 Out of the Top 10 Traits Men and Women Want In a Romantic Partner are the Same

When it comes to what men and women want in a romantic partner, they’re stereotyped as wanting drastically different things. However, research suggests that they actually have a lot in common.

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Red Is More Than A Holiday Color—It’s Also A Sexual Signal

Red Is More Than A Holiday Color—It’s Also A Sexual Signal

Red is one of the most common colors associated with Christmas. From Santa’s suit to Rudolph’s nose to that tacky sweater Grandma gave you last year, red is everywhere during the holiday season. Red is much more than just a holiday color, though; in fact, scientists believe that it’s also a sexual signal all year round.

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Do We Actually Know What We Desire In A Romantic Partner?

Do We Actually Know What We Desire In A Romantic Partner?

Survey research has consistently found that men and women differ in the degree to which they desire certain traits in their romantic partners, with men placing relatively more value on physical attractiveness and women placing relatively more value on status and wealth. These findings have often been explained in evolutionary terms (which you can read more about here). In light of this, one might naturally assume that these stated mate preferences would predict the characteristics of the persons that men and women actually express interest in; however, research suggests that this is not necessarily the case. In fact, our stated partner preferences might say relatively little about who we’re attracted to in real life.

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What's The Recipe For A Hit Song? Lyrics About Reproduction

What's The Recipe For A Hit Song? Lyrics About Reproduction

Evolutionary psychologists believe that men and women have evolved fundamentally different mating strategies in order to maximize the chances of passing along their genes to future generations. It is theorized that men developed a tendency to pursue short-term sexual encounters with young and curvy women, whereas women developed a tendency to hold out for long-term relationships with reliable men who have the resources necessary to take care of them and any offspring they might produce [1]. There is a substantial amount of research supporting the idea that men and women are looking for different things in their mates and these preferences generally fall along the lines predicted by this theory; however, a recent set of studies suggests that these tendencies are so deeply ingrained that we may have even developed a preference for popular media that reinforces these sexual strategies. 

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Do Men And Women Prefer Different Traits In A Romantic Partner?

Media reports tend to suggest that men and women are polar opposites when it comes to romantic attraction. Many news articles boil the difference down to “men care about looks, whereas women care about status and resources.” However, this is an extreme oversimplification. While many studies have found that men value physical attractiveness more than women and women value status and wealth more than men on average, the fact of the matter is that the sexes actually have a lot in common in the arena of mate selection.
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Sex Question Friday: Do Pick-Up Artists Really Know What They’re Talking About?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a reader of the blog who wanted to know whether there’s any science to back up the techniques promoted by professional pick-up artists.  

Have you read 'The Game' by Neil Strauss? In the book, Neil learns that (among other things) he needs to dress well, and with style, to get the ladies. It's advice that's common enough. But what, if any, is the evolutionary appeal to favor men who can dress well? Also I'd love to hear your thoughts on seduction/pickup-artistry/The Game.

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As Gender Equality Increases, Male And Female Mate Preferences Become More Similar

Research from multiple countries around the world has found that men tend to place more emphasis on youth and beauty while women tend to emphasize status and resources in their search for sexual and romantic partners [1]. The sheer number of studies conducted and the diversity of the samples utilized suggest that these gender differences in mating preferences are nearly universal. The explanation for why these differences ever emerged remains a hot topic of debate, with some theorists arguing that they reflect an evolved adaptation and others that they are a product of persistent societal inequalities that favor men. A new set of studies published in Psychological Science appears to provide some support for the latter perspective [2].
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