The Man Who Said a Vasectomy Made Him Gay

The Man Who Said a Vasectomy Made Him Gay

I spend a lot of time reading scientific journal articles as part of my job and, every now and then, I come across a paper that makes me say “WTF?” Case in point: in doing background research for a blog post about the effects of vasectomies on men’s sex lives a few weeks back, I stumbled onto a paper titled “Homosexual Behavior After Vasectomy.” It turned out to be a case report from 1980 about a man whose sexual orientation reportedly changed after he underwent a vasectomy.  

Yep—you read that right. A vasectomy supposedly made him gay. 

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How Vasectomies Affect Men’s (And Women’s) Sex Lives

How Vasectomies Affect Men’s (And Women’s) Sex Lives

Vasectomies are one of the most underutilized forms of birth control, in part, because a lot of men are worried about the procedure having a number of negative effects on their sex lives. According to the American Urological Association, “many patients are concerned that vasectomy may cause changes in sexual function such as erectile dysfunction, reduced or absent orgasmic sensation, decreased ejaculate volume, reduced sexual interest, decreased genital sensation and/or diminished sexual pleasure.”

But are these concerns founded? Do guys really need to be worried about vasectomies hurting their sex lives? 

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Vasectomies Are More Likely To Help Rather Than Hurt Your Sex Life

Vasectomies Are More Likely To Help Rather Than Hurt Your Sex Life

A lot of straight guys are freaked out by the idea of having a vasectomy. Some worry that it will make them "less of a man." Some are worried that it will be really painful. But, above all else, it seems that most men are hesitant to go under the knife because they are afraid it will hurt their sexual potency (e.g., that it might cause erectile difficulties, orgasm problems, etc.). Are these concerns really warranted, though? 

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Sex Question Friday: How Close Are We To Having A Male Version Of “The Pill?”

Every Friday on the blog, I answer readers' sex questions. This week, we’re talking about contraception. As you know, there are many forms of birth control available for women: the pill, the patch, the NuvaRing, hormone shots, IUDs, and so on. But what about guys? Is there anything they can do to reduce the risk of pregnancy during sex aside from the old standards (i.e., condoms and vasectomies)? Unfortunately, it’s much more difficult to biologically regulate male fertility than female fertility. Just think about it—is it easier to try and stop one egg per month from being released, or to try and stop up to a half billion sperm from being released per ejaculation? Despite the inherent difficultly of creating the male equivalent of “the pill,” some scientists have been hard at work and their research has yielded some promising new developments.
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