Sex Question Friday: How Much Can I Count On The Withdrawal Method?

Sex Question Friday: How Much Can I Count On The Withdrawal Method?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a reader who wants to know more about the withdrawal method of birth control.

When we don’t have condoms around, I don’t let my boyfriend ejaculate inside of me because I don’t want to get pregnant. We’ve done this several times and I have never gotten pregnant from it, but I always worry about it afterwards. I guess what I want to know is how worried I should be.

Read More

Why “Safe Sex” Isn’t Quite As Safe As You Think

Why “Safe Sex” Isn’t Quite As Safe As You Think

Although “safe sex” means different things to different people, the most common thing people associate with this term is the male condom. We have been told time and again by sexual health educators and condom manufacturers alike that condoms can be highly effective at preventing unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections (STIs)—and there is no disputing that. However, research has found that people tend to overestimate how effective condoms are in practice [1] and for that reason, it is important to step back and look at what condoms do and don’t do, and reconsider our usage of the term “safe sex.”

 

Read More

No-Cost Contraception May Reduce Abortion Rates and Teenage Pregnancies

Although the teenage birth rate has decreased in the United States in recent years, the percentage of teen girls giving birth is still higher here than anywhere else in the developed world. Likewise, while the U.S. abortion rate has also fallen, the number of abortions performed in this country each year is higher than it is in Canada, Europe, and a number of other countries. In order to address these issues, some doctors and sexual health experts have proposed making free or low-cost contraceptives more widely available. And, in fact, as of August 1, 2012, the Affordable Care Act now makes contraceptives available without a copay for women who begin new insurance plans or renew their old plans. But will greater access to contraceptives actually reduce abortion and teen pregnancy rates? According to a new study published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, the answer is a resounding yes.
Read More

Women Overestimate How Effective Most Forms of Contraception Really Are

Most heterosexual couples assume that if they’re using “the pill” or condoms to prevent pregnancy, they probably don’t have much to worry about because these forms of contraception are highly effective. The unfortunate reality, however, is that they are not as effective as many of us think. In fact, a new study finds that most women significantly overestimate how well most forms of reversible birth control actually work.
Read More