10 Surprising Facts About Birth Control

10 Surprising Facts About Birth Control

Did you know that Lysol and Coca-Cola used to be used as contraceptives? Or that usage of birth control pills is related not only to what women pay attention to when watching pornography, but also to the amount of money that a female stripper makes in tips? Read on to learn more about these and other surprising facts about the past, present, and future of birth control.

1. In the not-too-distant past, some women used to flush out their vaginas with Coca-Cola after sex in an attempt to prevent pregnancy. Believe it or not, there was even a paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1985 claiming that this technique actually worked (and not only that, but it also claimed that Diet Coke worked better than regular Coke!) [1]. However, subsequent research found that soda isn’t all that effective as a contraceptive and can potentially lead to vaginal infections [2].

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Have Scientists Finally Discovered “The Pill” For Men?

A few months back, I posted an article about some promising new developments in birth control for men. These included the “testicular zap,” which involves performing a specialized ultrasound on the testicles, as well as RISUG (Reversible Inhibition of Sperm Under Guidance), which involves injecting a chemical compound into the vas deferens that impairs the “swimming” capability of sperm that pass through it. Despite the potential of these methods, the last thing most guys want to hear in any discussion about birth control is that their scrotums need to be zapped or sliced open, so a lot of my male readers probably weren’t too impressed with these scientific discoveries. However, you guys (and many of your lady friends as well) will be pleased to hear that scientists may have finally discovered a reversible male contraceptive that won’t require bringing sharp objects or sound waves anywhere near your genitals.
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What Do Men and Women Focus On When They Watch Porn? The Answer Will Probably Surprise You

When someone watches pornography, what is it that first captures their attention? Most people would probably guess the actors’ bodies and/or genitals, especially if they’re talking about male porn viewers. Although this would seem to make intuitive sense, is it really the case? According to research, not necessarily.
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Oddities in the History of Contraception: From Coca-Cola Douches to Beaver Testicle Tea

Oddities in the History of Contraception: From Coca-Cola Douches to Beaver Testicle Tea
I recently posted an article discussing how women tend to overestimate the effectiveness of condoms and birth control pills. Even though these contraceptive devices aren’t quite as effective as we might like, they’re certainly far better than what people used to have in the past. In this article, I’d like to take you on a brief tour of five of the most interesting, bizarre, and humorous methods of birth control that have ever been attempted. After reading this, I think you’ll come to have a greater appreciation for modern contraceptives!
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Women Overestimate How Effective Most Forms of Contraception Really Are

Most heterosexual couples assume that if they’re using “the pill” or condoms to prevent pregnancy, they probably don’t have much to worry about because these forms of contraception are highly effective. The unfortunate reality, however, is that they are not as effective as many of us think. In fact, a new study finds that most women significantly overestimate how well most forms of reversible birth control actually work.
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Sex Question Friday: How Close Are We To Having A Male Version Of “The Pill?”

Every Friday on the blog, I answer readers' sex questions. This week, we’re talking about contraception. As you know, there are many forms of birth control available for women: the pill, the patch, the NuvaRing, hormone shots, IUDs, and so on. But what about guys? Is there anything they can do to reduce the risk of pregnancy during sex aside from the old standards (i.e., condoms and vasectomies)? Unfortunately, it’s much more difficult to biologically regulate male fertility than female fertility. Just think about it—is it easier to try and stop one egg per month from being released, or to try and stop up to a half billion sperm from being released per ejaculation? Despite the inherent difficultly of creating the male equivalent of “the pill,” some scientists have been hard at work and their research has yielded some promising new developments.
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