Men Who Have More Sex Have a Lower Risk of Heart Attacks

Men Who Have More Sex Have a Lower Risk of Heart Attacks

Scientists have found that sex seems to be good for us in many ways. For example, sexual activity has stress-relieving properties: when couples in a good quality relationship have sex on one day, they report feeling less stressed the next day. Moreover, having sex increases people’s sense of meaning in life and leads to a boost in positive mood states. Beyond these psychological effects, some research suggests that having frequent sex might also have benefits for your heart health.  

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Your Sex Life At Home May Affect How Happy And Productive You Are At Work

Your Sex Life At Home May Affect How Happy And Productive You Are At Work

Sex has the potential to benefit us in numerous ways. Among other things, research suggests that it may be good for our physical health (it is a form of exercise after all). In addition, sex relieves stress, it increases our sense of meaning in life, and it may even improve our memory.  A new study published this year in the Journal of Management suggests yet another potential benefit: sexual activity just might make us better at our jobs—at least on days following sex.

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Scientists Find More Evidence That Gay Men, On Average, Are Shorter Than Straight Men

Scientists Find More Evidence That Gay Men, On Average, Are Shorter Than Straight Men

Earlier this year, a study published in the Journal of Sex Research reported that gay men, on average, tend to be shorter than their heterosexual counterparts (click here to read a summary of the findings). This study had an important limitation, though, in that it wasn’t based on nationally representative data. Because all participants were either college students or attendees at an LGBT pride event, some concern was raised about how reliable the findings might be.

A new study that just appeared in the Archives of Sexual Behavior would appear to put this concern to rest. In it, the same group of researchers successfully replicated their height finding in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults.

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College Students Don’t Need To Be Protected From Sex Studies

College Students Don’t Need To Be Protected From Sex Studies

Before a scientific study is carried out, researchers usually need to receive approval from an Institutional Review Board (IRB), a body of fellow scientists who evaluate a given study’s potential risks and rewards. In the name of protecting research participants, IRBs often given studies focusing on “sensitive topics” heightened scrutiny.

Sex is often considered to be a sensitive topic, and many researchers (myself included) have encountered difficulties at one time or another in getting certain studies approved because their IRBs are concerned that students might be traumatized by certain kinds of sex questions (e.g., how would students who have been sexually victimized feel if they were asked questions about prior experiences with rape and sexual assault?).

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The Power Of Touch: The Crucial Role Of Physical Intimacy In Relationships

The Power Of Touch: The Crucial Role Of Physical Intimacy In Relationships

One of the keys to a healthy, long-term relationship is maintaining physical intimacy. I’m not just talking about sex, though—for many reasons, non-sexual physical intimacy is just as important. For one thing, touch is a form of communication. It can reveal everything from your partner’s current mood state to their stress level. In addition, touch stimulates the release of oxytocin, a hormone involved in feelings of bondedness. Touch can therefore bring you closer to your partner both physically and psychologically.

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The Marriage Hack (VIDEO)

The Marriage Hack (VIDEO)

In this TEDx video, Northwestern University psychology professor Eli Finkel explains how the nature of marriage has changed dramatically over the last few decades. In particular, people today have fewer close social connections outside of their marriages than ever before, which has led us to expect more and more of our spouses in order to compensate. The end result is that we are putting a lot of extra stress on our relationships, which leads to a seemingly inevitable decline in satisfaction over time. But is there anything we can do to stem the tide and keep our relationships strong and healthy?

 

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Sex Question Friday: Can Too Much Weed Hurt Your Sex Life?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a reader who wanted to know whether substance use can lead to problems “keeping it up” during sex.

What does it mean when men in college can't stay hard during sex? If you smoke a lot of weed, does that make it more difficult to stay hard in the same way alcohol does?

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Sex Question Friday: I Have A Higher Sex Drive Than My Boyfriend. What Can I Do?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a female reader who is frustrated by the fact that she wants to have sex more often than her boyfriend.   

So I am 20, my boyfriend is 23, and I have a MUCH higher sex drive than him. We have been together for 3 years, and he took my virginity when I was 17. Almost every time I want to have sex and I "put the moves on him" he pushes me away and tells me he's not in the mood and I'm starting to get frustrated. Is there any way you could help me or point me toward some helpful literature even?

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Can Frequent Orgasms Make You Healthier And Smarter?

One of the most common questions I get asked is whether too much sex or masturbation is bad for you. As I have written in previous posts, there is simply no evidence that having a high frequency of sexual activity will hurt you, unless you are doing it so much that it is causing you to miss work and/or it prevents you from having a social life (both of which are extremely rare problems to have). The reality is that having sex on a regular basis may actually be good for you. In fact, several studies have suggested that reaching orgasm more often might make you both smarter and healthier.  
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5 Reasons To Be Thankful For Sex Today And Every Other Day Of The Year

I know you all are thankful for lots of things today, but let’s not forget to be thankful for sex! Research has found that sex offers numerous benefits, both physical and psychological. In this post, I will highlight just 5, but there are certainly many, many others. So instead of just indulging in food today, consider indulging with your partner too. And remember that sex is a great way to burn off all of that turkey and pie!
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Fact Check: Do Stressed-Out Men Really Prefer Curvier Women?

Fact Check: Do Stressed-Out Men Really Prefer Curvier Women?
A recent study looking at the types of women that men are attracted to during times of stress made huge international news this month. Among the many headlines I came across reporting on this study were “Stressed-Out Guys Prefer Chubbier Women,” “Stressed Men Prefer Big Ladies,” and “Men Prefer Fat Women When Under Stress.” To the casual observer glancing at these headlines, the logical conclusion would appear to be that when men get stressed, their ideal partner’s body type becomes much larger. But is this really the case? Not exactly. As you’ll see below, it’s pretty clear that most of the reporters covering this story didn’t even bother to consult the original source.
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Sex Surveys Pose No Harm To Student Participants

Sex Surveys Pose No Harm To Student Participants
Sex surveys have been controversial ever since the pioneering work of Alfred Kinsey in the 1940s and 50s. There has been a persistent concern that asking people questions about sex is simply too personal and is likely to make them feel distressed and uncomfortable. Although there may have been some validity to this concern several decades ago, times have changed. We now live in a world where people talk about sex more freely than ever before and sex is represented everywhere in the media. So should ethics review boards continue to scrutinize sex studies more than other types of research? A new study suggests not.
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What Is The Role Of Testosterone In Male And Female Desire For Masturbation And Sex?

Sexual scientists have long believed that testosterone plays an important role in generating sexual desire. Just consult any Human Sexuality textbook and you’ll likely find a lengthy section talking about this hormone’s role in producing both male and female sexual interest and arousal. However, recent research is challenging some of our most widely held beliefs in this area. In particular, the idea that there is a positive, linear association between testosterone and desire (i.e., that increases in testosterone necessarily correspond to increases in desire) does not seem to hold up. In addition, this hormone may have somewhat different sexual effects in men and women.
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Could Being In A Marginalized Relationship Be Bad For Your Health?

Many people are involved in romantic relationships that are not accepted by their family, friends, or society at large. Sometimes it is because the partners are of the same sex, while other times it is because the partners are of different races or because one partner is much older than the other.  Regardless of why one’s relationship is socially rejected, this bias can have significant implications for the partners involved. For instance, the more relationship disapproval a couple experiences, the more likely they are to break up in the future.1 A brand new study suggests that the effects of romantic disapproval may extend even further than this and could potentially harm couple members' health and well-being.2
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Sexual Healing: Does Having Sex Relieve Stress For Couples?

Sexual Healing: Does Having Sex Relieve Stress For Couples?

Makes me feel so fine, helps me relieve my mind, sexual healing baby, it’s good for me. – Marvin Gaye

The idea that sex can relieve stress for couples is pervasive in popular culture. For example, most of you have probably heard the classic song Sexual Healing by Marvin Gaye. Many of you have probably also seen television shows and movies that feature storylines about the wonders of “makeup sex” following a couple's argument (which, according to Jerry Seinfeld, is the second best type of sex you can have after “conjugal visit sex”). So is there any truth to this idea? Is sex really a stress-reliever? According to a new study, yes—but only for couples who are in satisfying relationships to begin with [1].

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