The Link Between Homophobia and Insomnia and Why It Matters For LGB Health

The Link Between Homophobia and Insomnia and Why It Matters For LGB Health

Sexual minority individuals—that is, people who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, or who otherwise report same-sex attraction or behavior—are at increased risk for developing a number of physical health problems relative to people who are exclusively heterosexual. As some evidence of this, consider a new study published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior, which analyzed the health of sexual minorities in the United States using a nationally representative sample of more than 30,000 Americans [1].

No matter what measure of sexual orientation was utilized in this study (LGB identity, same-sex attraction, same-sex behavior), sexual minorities were at increased risk of various health problems compared to heterosexuals.

Read More

5 Ways Women Can Orgasm That Don’t Involve Sexual Activity

5 Ways Women Can Orgasm That Don’t Involve Sexual Activity

Women don’t need to have sex in order to reach orgasm. In fact, they don’t necessarily even need any genital stimulation at all. Here are five ways women can experience what scientists call “non-genital” orgasms.

1. Some women can literally think themselves to orgasm.

Read More

Study: People Who Sleep On Their Stomachs Have More Sex Dreams

Study: People Who Sleep On Their Stomachs Have More Sex Dreams

Most people have sex dreams. In fact, studies have found that as many as 93% of men and 86% of women say they’ve had them before [1]. For some, these dreams occur quite frequently; however, for others, they’re uncommon. Why is that? It might have to do with differences in the positions people sleep in.

Read More

Are Sex Dreams Related To Your Sleep Position?

Are Sex Dreams Related To Your Sleep Position?

Erotic dreams are common. In fact, research has found that as many as 93% of men and 86% of women report having had them before [1]. Some people dream about sex a lot more than others, though. Indeed, for some folks, such dreams are a pretty regular occurrence, whereas for others, they are pretty rare. Why is that? A new study suggests that one’s likelihood of having sex dreams may be a function of the position in which that person usually sleeps [2].

Read More

How Often Do You Think About Sex?

How Often Do You Think About Sex?

Conventional wisdom holds that men think about sex every seven seconds (or about 8,000 times per day, assuming an average of eight hours of sleep), while women think about sex rarely, or perhaps not at all. But is there any truth behind these stereotypes of men as hypersexual and women as hyposexual? A recent study published in the Journal of Sex Research reveals that men think about sex less and women think about sex more than most people assume.

 

Read More

Nocturnal Orgasms Aren’t Just For Men--Women Have Them Too

Nocturnal Orgasms Aren’t Just For Men--Women Have Them Too

"Masturbation and nocturnal sex dreams to the point of orgasm are the activities which provide the best measure of a female's intrinsic sexuality.” –Alfred Kinsey (1953)

Many people only associate terms such as “nocturnal orgasm” and “wet dream” with men. There are likely several reasons for this. One is the fact that sex education courses typically only discuss male orgasm—female orgasm (nocturnal or otherwise) is usually left out of the discussion completely. In addition, the sexuality narrative in our culture tends to portray male sexuality as more “uncontrollable” than female sexuality. For men, orgasming and ejaculating are seen as occurring almost effortlessly—not only does it happen to guys in their sleep, but during sex it often occurs prematurely. In contrast, the female orgasm is described as something that requires a lot of work and, even then, it’s not guaranteed to happen. However, the notion that nocturnal orgasms are a male phenomenon is patently false. Like female ejaculation, female nocturnal orgasms are an aspect of women’s sexuality that was discovered, described, and then forgotten long ago.

Read More

Sex Question Friday: Indicators of Penis Size, Sleeping After Sex, And The Orgasmic Gold Medal Winner

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s questions concern penis size, what men and women do after sex, and the record for most female orgasms during a single sexual event.  

Are there any anatomical structures that estimate or show penis size? Like hands or feet?

Read More

Are Men Really the First Ones to Fall Asleep After Sex?

Are Men Really the First Ones to Fall Asleep After Sex?
The stereotypical picture of a heterosexual couple post-coitus depicts a frustrated woman who wants to talk and cuddle staring at a sleeping (and usually snoring) man. Such tension between the sexes is just a natural part of life, right? I mean, this scenario has played out time and again in movies and television shows, and there’s even a book out there written by a physician entitled Why Do Men Fall Asleep After Sex?: More Questions You'd Only Ask a Doctor After Your Third Whiskey Sour. Despite how widespread this belief is, recent research does not back it up [1].
Read More