Exercise Can Help Prevent and Treat Erectile Dysfunction

Exercise Can Help Prevent and Treat Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction or ED is one of the most common sexual difficulties experienced by men. As with most sexual difficulties, there are numerous potential causes, including some that are biological, psychological, and social. However, a growing amount of research suggests that, in many cases, ED is a function of lifestyle. Moreover, simply by getting more exercise, men may be able to reduce their risk of developing ED and resolve existing erectile problems at the same time.

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Is Asexuality a Sexual Orientation?

Is Asexuality a Sexual Orientation?

In a forthcoming issue of the Archives of Sexual Behavior, a special section will be devoted to articles that address “the puzzle of sexual orientation.” I’ve been able to read a few of the articles so far, and it’s shaping up to be nothing short of fascinating! As such, I plan to cover at least a few of the articles here on Sex & Psychology. In fact, I’ve already covered one of them, which focused on the link between men’s height and their sexual orientation (read it here).

Today, I’m covering an article that addresses asexualityThis paper, co-authored by Drs. Lori Brotto and Morag Yule, was designed to explore the controversy over the nature of asexuality. This is something people have been debating for years. Some have argued that it’s a mental disorder, others have called it a sexual dysfunction, some think of it as a paraphilia (i.e., an unusual sexual interest), and yet others consider it a sexual orientation. So what does the research say? Let’s take a look.

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A Painful Clitoral Erection That Last For Days? It Happens To Some Women

A Painful Clitoral Erection That Last For Days? It Happens To Some Women

If you have ever seen a commercial for Viagra or any other erectile dysfunction drug, you've probably heard the advertiser warn male users to seek medical attention if they develop an erection lasting longer than four hours. I know some of you are probably thinking that a four-hour hard-on sounds like a positive side effect, but it isn’t. An erection that won’t go away on its own is a serious medical condition known as priapism (on a side note, priapism derives its name from the Greek god Priapus, who was always depicted in paintings and sculptures as having a gigantic, permanently erect penis). Such erections are not caused by prolonged sexual stimulation; rather, they result from blood being trapped in the penis instead of circulating normally. This condition is often quite painful and, if let untreated, can be very dangerous. In fact, without proper bloodflow, blot clots can develop and the penile tissue can become damaged or even die, which can potentially result in a permanent case of erectile dysfunction. As it turns out, however, priapism isn’t a problem that is unique to men—in fact, some women have developed priapism of the clitoris.

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Study: Men Who Exercise More Report Better Erectile Function

Study: Men Who Exercise More Report Better Erectile Function

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the most common sexual difficulties reported by men. It is a complex problem that can be caused by numerous factors, including some that are biological, psychological, and social. In recent years, a significant amount or research attention has been devoted to understanding ways of preventing and treating ED, and a growing number of studies point to one thing men can do to potentially help themselves in this area that does not require popping any pills or spending any money: get more exercise. 

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Men's Most Common Sexual Problems (Infographic)

Men's Most Common Sexual Problems (Infographic)

Sexual difficulties are incredibly common. In fact, data from nationally representative surveys suggests that nearly half of men and women report having experienced at least one sexual problem in the last year! Check out the infographic below for a closer look at men's reports of sexual problems and some of the factors associated with them based on data from the most recent version of the National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3). For a look at what this same survey has revealed about the most common sexual problems facing women, check out this infographic.

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Why The New Diagnostic Guidelines For Premature Ejaculation Are A Step Backwards

Why The New Diagnostic Guidelines For Premature Ejaculation Are A Step Backwards

What exactly does it mean for a man to ejaculate “prematurely?” This has been a topic of considerable scientific debate for quite some time, with many arguing that the current classification criteria for premature ejaculation are vague and unclear. A new report just published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine attempts to remedy this by proposing what is supposedly an objective, evidence-based definition. However, I have some concerns that the new criteria may end up creating more problems than they solve.

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Women's Most Common Sexual Problems (Infographic)

Women's Most Common Sexual Problems (Infographic)

Sexual functioning plays a huge role not only in terms of how we feel about ourselves, but also how we feel about our relationships. Despite its great importance to everyday quality of life, there is surprisingly little research out there examining the prevalence of sexual difficulties and the factors associated with them. Check out the infographic below for a look at some brand new data from the National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles concerning women's reports of sexual problems. Next week, we'll take a look at some of the most common sexual difficulties facing men.

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Can Botox Be Used To Treat Premature Ejaculation?

Can Botox Be Used To Treat Premature Ejaculation?

Botox is most well known for its ability to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles on the face; however, it actually has a surprising number of medical applications. In fact, physicians have used it to treat everything from migraines, to excessive sweating, to eyelid and muscle spasms, to overactive bladders, to crossed eyes! Botox works as a treatment for these and other medical issues by temporarily paralyzing certain muscles. So why am I writing about Botox on a sex blog? Because doctors have found that this drug can be used to treat sexual dysfunctions too. For instance, studies have shown that Botox is an effective treatment for vaginismus, a condition in which the muscles around the vaginal opening involuntarily contract so tightly that penetration becomes very painful or impossible [1]. The latest research on Botox suggests that it may also be a novel treatment a far more common sexual difficulty, premature ejaculation.

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Sex Question Friday: I Can’t Seem To Orgasm. What Should I Do?

Sex Question Friday: I Can’t Seem To Orgasm. What Should I Do?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a female reader who can’t reach orgasm in any sexual situation and wants to know what she should do.

I can't climax. It does not happen with my partner, nor does it happen in a hookup. It does not happen during intercourse, nor during masturbation or oral stimulation. Should I see a doctor about that? Or maybe a sex therapist? 

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Sex Question Friday: Should You Expect Your Partner To Orgasm During Sex?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a reader who wanted to know whether it is reasonable to “expect” an orgasm from your partner every time you have sex.

Is it normal for women to expect orgasm (ejaculation) during intercourse from a male partner? And is it natural for men to expect orgasm during intercourse from a female partner?

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What The DSM-5 Means For The Diagnosis And Treatment Of Sexual Issues

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is the “bible” that psychiatrists and psychologists in the United States use for diagnosing mental health problems. Just a few days ago, the American Psychiatric Association released the latest version, known as the DSM-5, which represents the first major overhaul of the manual in 13 years. The new version has been met with a good deal of controversy, which has already been covered extensively in the popular media. One thing that has not been particularly well-covered, though, is the DSM-5’s implications for the diagnosis and treatment of sexual issues.
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Sexual Desire Discrepancies Are A Relationship Problem, Not A Gender Problem

A recent piece in the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) entitled “How often should married couples have sex? What happens when he says ‘more’ and she says ‘no?” caused quite a stir this past week. The original piece told the tale of a married couple (Chris and Afton) that developed a sexual desire discrepancy (the clinical term for a case in which one partner wants more sex than the other). The couple communicated with each other about the discrepancy, read a self-help book together, and ultimately worked through it. That’s a positive outcome, right?  Judging by the responses that appeared on Jezebel, The Week, New York Magazine, and several other websites, this is anything but a happy ending. The problem? The partner who desired more sex in this scenario was male and the one who wanted less sex was female.
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Sex Question Friday: How Long Can You Go Without Wanting Sex?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a reader who wanted to know:   

How long can a person go without wanting physical sex?  Will that need ever come back at a specific time in a person’s life?

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Sex Surrogacy: The “Hands-On” Approach to Sex Therapy

“The best therapy for a man suffering impotence…may be a therapist-supplied ‘other woman’ who embodies patience. Actual patience with a willing woman is crucial.” – Quote from the November 1, 1969 San Francisco Chronicle

Some within the sexual health community have argued that the best way to resolve a sexual difficulty is to “practice” with a substitute partner who is very knowledgeable and experienced. Although this idea has garnered a lot of recent attention with the release of the provocative film The Sessions starring Helen Hunt, sex surrogacy first catapulted into the public spotlight in the 1970s when Masters and Johnson publicly advocated for at least some usage of so-called “surrogate” partners in the practice of sex therapy. As part of their pioneering research, Masters and Johnson actually recruited female volunteers to serve as sex surrogates for single men who were experiencing sexual difficulties and achieved a very high rate of success in treating erectile dysfunction. However, this approach was greeted with a great deal of skepticism and concern by both the broader community of sex therapists and the general public alike. So what is the status of sex surrogate therapy today?

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Sex Question Friday: I Have A Higher Sex Drive Than My Boyfriend. What Can I Do?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a female reader who is frustrated by the fact that she wants to have sex more often than her boyfriend.   

So I am 20, my boyfriend is 23, and I have a MUCH higher sex drive than him. We have been together for 3 years, and he took my virginity when I was 17. Almost every time I want to have sex and I "put the moves on him" he pushes me away and tells me he's not in the mood and I'm starting to get frustrated. Is there any way you could help me or point me toward some helpful literature even?

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Does Sexual Arousal Override Feelings of Disgust?

Does Sexual Arousal Override Feelings of Disgust?

“A man who will kiss a pretty girl’s lips passionately may perhaps be disgusted at the idea of using her toothbrush, though there are no grounds for supposing that his own oral cavity, for which he feels no disgust, is any cleaner than the girl’s.” – Sigmund Freud

Sweat. Saliva. Sexual fluids. Outside the context of a sexual encounter, all of these bodily secretions have a tendency to be viewed as, well, kind of gross. But during sexual activity, people don’t mind them at all and, in fact, some of us derive great pleasure from them. This begs the question of how something that normally disgusts us could be viewed so differently when we’re in bed. A new study suggests that feelings of sexual arousal may serve to override our disgust impulses.

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The Great Porn Experiment

The Great Porn Experiment

In this TEDx video, Gary Wilson discusses his view on how heavy use of online porn may be affecting men’s sex lives. As Wilson points out, accessing pornography through high speed Internet is fundamentally different from how guys used to get their kicks (e.g., by reading Playboy magazine) because it provides a constant barrage of new people and new sexual activities. While I think we can all agree that this is true, the claims he makes about the problematic effects of pornography are debatable.

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Sex Question Friday: How Long Should Sex Last And How Do You Treat Premature Ejaculation?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question is a two-parter that comes from a male college student who was concerned about not lasting long enough in bed.  

What is the normal time span for intercourse? And how is premature ejaculation treated?

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Sex Question Friday: The G-Spot, Virginity Loss, and Sex in Your Twilight Years

Sex Question Friday: The G-Spot, Virginity Loss, and Sex in Your Twilight Years
Every Friday on the blog, I answer a few burning sex questions submitted to me by actual college students. This week, we’re talking about whether the G-spot is real, the average age at which men and women lose their virginity, and whether it’s possible for older adults to maintain a satisfying sex life.
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Women Can Orgasm Prematurely, Too

Women Can Orgasm Prematurely, Too

Premature ejaculation is the most commonly reported sexual difficulty among men. In fact, more than one in five guys reaches orgasm before they (or their partners) would like [1]. Although the popular media tends to depict premature ejaculation in a humorous, lighthearted way (ever seen American Pie?), this problem is actually quite distressing to those who live with it.

Until recently, sexuality researchers were under the impression that reaching orgasm too quickly was a sexual dysfunction unique to men and that, if anything, women only suffered from the opposite problem of taking too long to climax. However, there is now scientific evidence that at least some women can't last as long as they would like to in bed [2].

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