5 Things You Should Know About Bisexuality For LGBT Pride Month

5 Things You Should Know About Bisexuality For LGBT Pride Month

Bisexuality continues to be a widely misunderstood sexual orientation. Given that this is LGBT Pride Month, I thought it would be useful to put together an article that explores some of the key findings that scientists have uncovered about bisexuality that can speak to some of the biggest misconceptions about it. Here goes:

1.) Bisexuality is real, and it’s not the same as being gay or lesbian. A lot of people deny the existence of bisexuality and assume that everyone who identifies as bisexual is secretly gay; however, the results of several studies reveal that bisexuality involves a distinct pattern of sexual interest and arousal compared to homosexuality.

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The Link Between Homophobia and Insomnia and Why It Matters For LGB Health

The Link Between Homophobia and Insomnia and Why It Matters For LGB Health

Sexual minority individuals—that is, people who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, or who otherwise report same-sex attraction or behavior—are at increased risk for developing a number of physical health problems relative to people who are exclusively heterosexual. As some evidence of this, consider a new study published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior, which analyzed the health of sexual minorities in the United States using a nationally representative sample of more than 30,000 Americans [1].

No matter what measure of sexual orientation was utilized in this study (LGB identity, same-sex attraction, same-sex behavior), sexual minorities were at increased risk of various health problems compared to heterosexuals.

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Sexual Orientation and Mental Health: Are Bisexuals at Greater Risk for Depression and Anxiety?

Sexual Orientation and Mental Health: Are Bisexuals at Greater Risk for Depression and Anxiety?

Psychologists have long known that gays and lesbians have an elevated risk of depression and anxiety compared to heterosexual individuals. This health disparity is thought to be due in large part to the chronic, high levels of stress faced by sexual minorities due to their stigmatized social status.

But what about bisexual persons? Do they face similar mental health disparities? Are they perhaps even worse off due to the fact that bisexuals often face prejudice from both the gay and heterosexual communities? Unfortunately, most research on the mental health of sexual minorities has lumped bisexuals together with gays and lesbians, making it difficult to determine exactly how bisexual individuals stack up relative to other groups. However, a new review paper published in the Journal of Sex Research offers some insight.

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People Are More Willing To Have Sex With Bisexuals Than Have Relationships With Them

People Are More Willing To Have Sex With Bisexuals Than Have Relationships With Them

Bisexual people, both male and female, tend to be stereotyped negatively. For example, they are often seen as sexually confused, secretly gay, highly promiscuous, and incapable of monogamy. These negative views of bisexuals are held not just by many heterosexual persons, but also by many gays and lesbians as well. A recent study suggests that the popularity of these negative stereotypes could have implications for the sexual and romantic lives of bisexual persons.

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John Oliver on the Challenges of Being Transgender (Video)

John Oliver on the Challenges of Being Transgender (Video)

In the last few years, LGBT rights have advanced greatly in America; however, most of the benefits have gone to the Ls, Gs, and Bs. Far fewer have gone to the Ts. For instance, among the many states that have amended their non-discrimination laws, more have included sexual orientation than gender identity. Such disparities are likely a big part of the reason why trans individuals face higher rates of harassment and violence.

In a recent segment from Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Oliver takes an in-depth look at the current state of transgender rights in America.

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5 Scientific Facts About Bisexuality

5 Scientific Facts About Bisexuality

Bisexuality is a widely misunderstood sexual orientation that is the target of numerous myths and stereotypes. In light of this, I thought it would be useful to put together an article that explores some of the key findings that scientists have uncovered about bisexuality that are not only informative, but can also speak to some of the biggest misperceptions about it.

1.) Bisexuality is real, and it’s not the same as being gay or lesbian. A lot of people deny the existence of bisexuality and assume that everyone who identifies as bisexual is secretly gay; however, the results of several studies reveal that bisexuality involves a distinct pattern of sexual interest and arousal compared to homosexuality.

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Willingness To Date Bisexuals Among Gay And Straight Men And Women

Willingness To Date Bisexuals Among Gay And Straight Men And Women

Bisexual persons are frequently stereotyped as being sexually confused, secretly gay, highly promiscuous, and incapable of maintaining a monogamous relationship. These negative views of bisexuals are held by many heterosexuals, as well as by many gays and lesbians. What are the implications of all of this binegativity? A recent study published in the journal Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity suggests that one possible outcome is that both gay and heterosexual persons may be less interested in having sexual and romantic relationships with bisexual persons

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Can Science Help Reduce GLBT Hate Crimes?

Can Science Help Reduce GLBT Hate Crimes?

Hate crimes are an all too common reality in the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) community. There have been countless instances in recent years in which GLBT persons have been the victims of vicious attacks because of their actual or perceived identity. Despite the increased social acceptance of GLBT individuals we have witnessed, the number of hate crimes has actually risen in many areas, including some places that are considered to be relatively gay-friendly (e.g., New York City). So is there anything that can be done to reduce and prevent future hate crimes? This is the research question Dr. Karen Blair of the University of Utah hopes to answer in a planned study, but she needs our help in order to carry out this important research project.

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Men’s And Women’s Attitudes Toward Male And Female Bisexuals

Men’s And Women’s Attitudes Toward Male And Female Bisexuals

Over the past two decades, psychologists have devoted significant research attention to understanding the origin and nature of prejudice against gays and lesbians. At the same time, prejudice against bisexuals has been largely overlooked. What little research exists on this topic suggests that bisexuals are typically viewed negatively—and, not only that, but in national U.S. survey data, bisexuals are actually viewed less favorably than persons who are exclusively gay [1]. So where does this negativity come from? And do people feel differently about male vs. female bisexuals? A new study published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior yields some answers to these questions.

 

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