From Oysters to Chocolate to Ginseng: Aphrodisiacs that Do and Don’t Work, According to Science

From Oysters to Chocolate to Ginseng: Aphrodisiacs that Do and Don’t Work, According to Science

People have been searching for tools to enhance their sex lives for centuries. Historically, and even today, they have looked to various herbs and foods in the hope of finding an aphrodisiac that will enhance sexual desire, performance, or satisfaction. While many foods and herbs have been touted as aphrodisiacs, however, there hasn’t necessarily been a lot of evidence to back up these claims. And, in some cases, the data suggest that they might not be very effective after all.

In this post, we’ll take a look at what research says about some of the most well-known aphrodisiacs, according to a recent review of the literature published in the journal Sexual Medicine Reviews.

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Sex Research Roundup: Pornography, Consensual Nonmonogamy, & Aphrodisiacs

Sex Research Roundup: Pornography, Consensual Nonmonogamy, & Aphrodisiacs

Here’s a brief recap of the most interesting sex research reports that crossed my desk this week. They include studies on how scientists should be measuring porn use, how consensual nonmonogamy is linked to relationship quality, and whether “natural” aphrodisiacs really work as advertised.

Regnerus, M., Gordon, D., & Price, J. (in press). Documenting pornography use in America: A comparative analysis of methodological approaches. The Journal of Sex Research.

This is actually one of two papers I’ve seen in the past month that talks about some of the problems inherent in studying porn use. This one focused on the timeframe researchers should ask about when trying to determine how frequently people are using porn.

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Do Aphrodisiacs Really Work?

Do Aphrodisiacs Really Work?
People around the world have long believed that certain foods are aphrodisiacs. Oysters, bananas, figs, cucumbers…the list goes on and on. But can eating any of these foods really increase sexual desire and behavior? Perhaps. But before you go booking next Friday’s date at that expensive and exclusive raw bar, you should probably know that any effects these supposed aphrodisiacs might have on your sex life are probably due to psychology, not physiology.
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