Where Do Our Sexual Attractions Come From?

Where Do Our Sexual Attractions Come From?

Why are we sexually attracted to some people, but not others? Where do our attractions come from in the first place? 

As a social psychologist who has studied issues of attraction extensively, I’ve learned that attraction is a verycomplex process. As I discuss in my book The Psychology of Human Sexuality, attraction is influenced by a wide range of biological, psychological, and social/environmental/cultural factors. For example:

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Sex Is Good For Our Mental Health

Sex Is Good For Our Mental Health

Sex stands to benefit us in many ways. For example, research has found that being sexually active appears to be good for our physical health—not only does having sex burn calories, but frequent orgasms have been linked to better immune function and longer life expectancies. In addition, sex has been linked to enhanced cognitive functioning (including better memory), which suggests the provocative possibility that having sex just might make us smarter. As if that weren’t enough, a new study published in the journal Emotion reveals that sex also seems to be good for our mental health and well-being.

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Why The Daily Mail Is A Terrible Source For Sex News

One of the reasons I started this blog is because I saw too many media reports about sex research that were sensationalized, misleading, and (in some cases) just plain wrong. In response, I have sought to create a resource for the public that provides an accurate and unbiased look at the science of sex. If there’s one media outlet that I wish would take a page from my book, it has to be The Daily Mail. I frequently come across sex headlines from them that make me cringe. Below, I take a look at five of their worst headlines of all time and clarify what the research actually says.
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Do Men Find Women’s Bodies Hotter in the Winter or in the Summer? The Answer Isn't As Obvious As You Might Think

Psychologists have known for some time that people’s mood states and behaviors can change with the seasons. For instance, some people experience what is known as Seasonal Affective Disorder, a form of depression that kicks in at a specific time of year, usually in the winter. Although experiencing such extreme changes is relatively rare, researchers have found that smaller seasonal fluctuations in physiological and psychological processes are actually quite common, even among healthy people [1]. Psychologists have recently begun exploring the implications of these changes for our sexual and romantic lives and have found that, at least among heterosexual men, their attraction to women’s bodies appears to depend upon the season [2].
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