Could An Infectious Organism Take Over Your Brain And Make You Do Its Bidding?

Could An Infectious Organism Take Over Your Brain And Make You Do Its Bidding?

We humans like to think of ourselves as having free will. We like to think, for instance, that how many sexual partners we have and how quick we are to jump into bed with someone is all a matter of personal choice, right? But what if this wasn't entirely true? What if I said there might be microorganisms that enter our bodies, "hijack" our brains, and direct our behaviors (sexually and otherwise) for their own purposes (e.g., to spread to other persons and reproduce)? I know--you'd probably think I've been watching too many science fiction movies. However, this concept actually isn't that far-fetched. In fact, some research suggests that this very thing actually happens in the animal kingdom.

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Sex Question Friday: How Common Are Genital Piercings?

Sex Question Friday: How Common Are Genital Piercings?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a reader who wanted to know:

“How many people have their penises or vaginas pierced? And do many people have problems these piercings?”

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Sex Question Friday: Is “Rimming” Safe?

Sex Question Friday: Is “Rimming” Safe?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a reader who wanted to know:

“Is rimming safe?”

In case anyone reading this is unfamiliar with the term “rimming,” what we’re talking about here is oral stimulation of the anus (also known as anilingus).

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Hijacked By STIs: Infections That Spread By Increasing The Host’s Interest In Sex

Hijacked By STIs: Infections That Spread By Increasing The Host’s Interest In Sex

Bacteria and viruses are crafty little organisms. They need to be spread quickly from host to host in order to survive, so they tend to evolve in ways that ensure fast and efficient transmission. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are no exception. Consider this: part of the reason STIs are so widely spread in humans is because many infections (e.g., chlamydia, gonorrhea, HIV) take weeks or months (or even longer) for symptoms to set in, but during that entire period of time, the host remains highly infectious. For an STI to be spread even faster, all it would have to do is capitalize on this asymptomatic period by working as an aphrodisiac and increasing the host’s desire for sex. Although I am not aware of any research suggesting that STIs increase libido in humans to help them infect even more people, research has found an STI in crickets that seems to do something like this.

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Sex Question Friday: Do STDs Affect Women's Ability To Reach Orgasm?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a college student who wanted to know whether having a sexually transmitted disease (STD) can interfere with a woman’s sexual pleasure.

If you happen to contract an STD, is it more difficult to induce a female orgasm?

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