How To Get Over Your Ex, According To Science

How To Get Over Your Ex, According To Science

It can be challenging to get over a breakup. Many people find that they can’t stop thinking about their ex and that this has negative implications for their mental health, including depression and anxiety. So if you’re having trouble moving on, is there anything you can do?

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Do Sex Workers Have Better Mental Health In Cultures Where Prostitution Is Legal?

Do Sex Workers Have Better Mental Health In Cultures Where Prostitution Is Legal?

Today in my study abroad course on sex and culture in the Netherlands, we're focusing on sex work, especially the link between prostitution and mental health. Many studies have been conducted on the mental health of people (mostly women) who sell sex for a living. Most of this research has found that female sex workers suffer from rates of depression, anxiety, and PTSD that are much higher than the rest of the female population. However, virtually of all of this research is based on studies of female sex workers who live in countries where prostitution is illegal.

So what about places, like the Netherlands where sex work is permitted under the law?

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Sexual Orientation and Mental Health: Are Bisexuals at Greater Risk for Depression and Anxiety?

Sexual Orientation and Mental Health: Are Bisexuals at Greater Risk for Depression and Anxiety?

Psychologists have long known that gays and lesbians have an elevated risk of depression and anxiety compared to heterosexual individuals. This health disparity is thought to be due in large part to the chronic, high levels of stress faced by sexual minorities due to their stigmatized social status.

But what about bisexual persons? Do they face similar mental health disparities? Are they perhaps even worse off due to the fact that bisexuals often face prejudice from both the gay and heterosexual communities? Unfortunately, most research on the mental health of sexual minorities has lumped bisexuals together with gays and lesbians, making it difficult to determine exactly how bisexual individuals stack up relative to other groups. However, a new review paper published in the Journal of Sex Research offers some insight.

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Sex Question Friday: I Can’t Seem To Orgasm. What Should I Do?

Sex Question Friday: I Can’t Seem To Orgasm. What Should I Do?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a female reader who can’t reach orgasm in any sexual situation and wants to know what she should do.

I can't climax. It does not happen with my partner, nor does it happen in a hookup. It does not happen during intercourse, nor during masturbation or oral stimulation. Should I see a doctor about that? Or maybe a sex therapist? 

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Why The Daily Mail Is A Terrible Source For Sex News

One of the reasons I started this blog is because I saw too many media reports about sex research that were sensationalized, misleading, and (in some cases) just plain wrong. In response, I have sought to create a resource for the public that provides an accurate and unbiased look at the science of sex. If there’s one media outlet that I wish would take a page from my book, it has to be The Daily Mail. I frequently come across sex headlines from them that make me cringe. Below, I take a look at five of their worst headlines of all time and clarify what the research actually says.
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Does Penis Enlargement Surgery Really Work?

One of the most common concerns men have about their bodies is the size of their penis. Research indicates that 35% of gay men1 and 45% of heterosexual men2 say they wish they could be a different size—and almost all of these men want to be larger (less than 2% wish they were smaller). Why is this the case? Because guys are constantly told that “bigger is better,” especially by the porn industry, where men who practically have third legs are routinely glorified. As a result of this social pressure, guys are increasingly going under the knife in order to enhance the size of their packages. But do these surgeries work as promised and are they worth the exorbitant costs?
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Sex Question Friday: I Have Trouble Getting Physical Because of My Past. What Can I Do?

Sex Question Friday: I Have Trouble Getting Physical Because of My Past. What Can I Do?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a reader of the blog who is having issues expressing physical intimacy as a result of a previous sexual trauma.

I have a problem getting physical with anyone because of my past. I was molested and almost raped when I was younger and anytime I try to be physical with my partner, I start having a panic attack. Are there any studies about this kind of thing about a solution? It doesn’t help that my partner isn't as understanding as they should be, but I would really like to get past this. Thanks for any help you can offer.

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Physician Loses Job After Suggesting Semen Is A Better Valentine’s Day Gift Than Chocolates

Physician Loses Job After Suggesting Semen Is A Better Valentine’s Day Gift Than Chocolates

Yes, you read that headline right. Last year, the president elect of the American College of Surgeons, Dr. Lazar Greenfield, resigned from his position after penning a controversial Valentine’s Day editorial in Surgical News. In his editorial, Greenfield cited a controversial journal article published a decade ago which found that women who did not use condoms reported fewer depressive symptoms than women who practiced safe sex [1]. Based upon these results, some scientists have argued that semen may have antidepressant properties. Greenfield is an apparent believer because he wrote in Surgical News that “there’s a deeper bond between men and women than St Valentine would have suspected, and now we know there’s a better gift for that day than chocolates.” Female surgeons around the world were offended (and rightfully so) at Greenfield’s implication that semen is the best “gift” for women. Most media outlets that covered this story focused only on the sexism embedded in Greenfield’s editorial, but if you’re anything like me, you probably couldn’t help but wonder whether the study Greenfield cited has even a hint of scientific validity. Does it really provide evidence that semen has beneficial effects on women’s psychological well-being? Let's take a closer look at the research.

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Sex Question Friday: Shower Sex, Natural Male Enhancement, and Bisexuality

Sex Question Friday: Shower Sex, Natural Male Enhancement, and Bisexuality
Every time I teach a Human Sexuality course, I give my students the opportunity to anonymously submit any questions they have about sex. Over the years, I've seen a lot of similar questions pop up, so I thought it might be worthwhile to distribute some of the answers more broadly. Thus, I'm pleased to announce the introduction of Sex Question Fridays to the blog. Each Friday, I will answer a few burning sex questions posed by actual college students.  To kick off the inaugural edition, we’re going to talk about shower sex, “natural male enhancement,” and bisexuality. Not a bad way to start the weekend!
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Women Can Orgasm Prematurely, Too

Women Can Orgasm Prematurely, Too

Premature ejaculation is the most commonly reported sexual difficulty among men. In fact, more than one in five guys reaches orgasm before they (or their partners) would like [1]. Although the popular media tends to depict premature ejaculation in a humorous, lighthearted way (ever seen American Pie?), this problem is actually quite distressing to those who live with it.

Until recently, sexuality researchers were under the impression that reaching orgasm too quickly was a sexual dysfunction unique to men and that, if anything, women only suffered from the opposite problem of taking too long to climax. However, there is now scientific evidence that at least some women can't last as long as they would like to in bed [2].

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Are Sexually Active Teenagers At Greater Risk For Depression? "Yes," Say Hamsters

I recently read an article entitled Teen Sex May Affect Brain Development, which suggested that sexually active adolescents may have an elevated risk of mood disorders compared to their peers who remain abstinent. Several prominent news sites have run similar stories in recent days. This got me wondering whether there was anything to this idea. Are sexually active teenagers really more prone to psychological problems? My analysis of the research in this area suggests that this is not the case.
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