Why You Should Take Your Time When Putting On A Condom

Why You Should Take Your Time When Putting On A Condom

Condoms are one of the best tools we have available for reducing the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and preventing unintended pregnancies. Unfortunately, however, they don’t provide quite as much protection as they could. This is because people make a lot of mistakes when it comes to wearing and using condoms. These mistakes include using sharp objects to open condom packages, failing to check the expiration date, and taking the condom off before sex is over.

Why are these and other condom use errors so common? There are multiple reasons, not the least of which is a lack of knowledge about proper condom use, owing in large part to poor sex education. However, a study published in the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections suggests at least one other important contributor: rushed condom application.

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Are Sex Researchers More Sexually Active Than Everyone Else?

Are Sex Researchers More Sexually Active Than Everyone Else?

When you study sex for a living, people have a tendency to think that you really love sex—and that you must be having it all the time, too! In other words, people often assume that you’re doing “mesearch” instead of research.

But is that really the case? Are sex researchers any more sexually active than the rest of the population? Let's take a look at the data.

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Why You Shouldn’t Rush When Putting on a Condom

Why You Shouldn’t Rush When Putting on a Condom

Condoms are one of the best tools we have for reducing the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and preventing unintended pregnancies. Unfortunately, however, they don’t always provide as much protection as they could because people tend to make a lot of mistakes when it comes to applying condoms. These mistakes include using sharp objects to open condom packages, not checking the expiration date, and taking the condom off before sex is finished. Why are condom use errors so common? Undoubtedly, there are multiple reasons, not the least of which is a simple lack of knowledge regarding proper condom use. However, a recent study published in the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections points to at least one other important potential contributor: rushed condom application.

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Straight Men Say They’re Less Likely to Use Condoms with Attractive Women

Straight Men Say They’re Less Likely to Use Condoms with Attractive Women

A heterosexual man’s interest in using condoms depends upon a lot of things, including his overall attitudes toward condoms, his perceived ability to use them effectively, and whether or not his partner is on the pill or using another form of birth control. Interestingly, another factor that seems to affect men’s willingness to use condoms is the perceived attractiveness of their partners. According to a new study published in the journal BMJ Open, the better-looking straight men perceive a female partner to be, the less likely they are to want to use condoms with her.

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How Often Do People Make Condom Use Mistakes? (Infographic)

Condoms are one of the most popular and effective methods of protection against both sexually transmitted infections and unplanned pregnancies. However, in order to provide this protection, condoms must be used consistently and correctly. So do people know how to use condoms the right way? According to a recent review of dozens of studies published in the journal Sexual Health, it looks like a lot of us could use a refresher course. Check out the infographic below for a sampling of just a few of the condom use errors uncovered in this research. For information on how to use a condom correctly, check out this helpful page from the CDC or this page from Planned Parenthood.
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Is Sexual Content In Movies Related To Sexual Risk Taking?

Over the past two decades, sexual content in the movies and on television has become more explicit than ever before. These graphic depictions of sex have become a source of social concern for many parents, who worry that the increased visibility of sex in the media may lead adolescent viewers to imitate the behaviors they see on screen. This concern is compounded by the fact that most media depictions of sex portray it in risky and unrealistic terms. For example, an analysis of sexual content from the most popular movies released between 1983 and 2003 revealed that the vast majority of sex acts depicted (70%) occurred among people who had just met, and almost every scene (98%) failed to address the topic of contraception in any way.1 Not only that, but virtually none of these sexual acts resulted in negative consequences (e.g., unintended pregnancies, STIs, etc.). So is parents' concern warranted? Do such media depictions of sex have the potential to generate risky sexual behaviors among adolescents? A recent study published in Psychological Science suggests that they might.
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When It Comes To Condoms, One Size Does Not Fit All

Most condoms manufactured and distributed today consist of a “standard” length and width [1]. While the exact dimensions vary slightly across condom companies, there seems to be a widespread assumption that condoms (like baseball caps) are “one size fits all.” As some evidence of this, if you have ever been to an event where free condoms were handed out, did you notice different stations giving out condoms for differently sized penises? Probably not. At events like this, the only way the condoms differ meaningfully is usually in terms of novelty (i.e., color, flavor, packaging, etc.). This “one size fits all” mentality has increasingly been recognized as a factor that may be undermining safe sex practices because when condoms do not fit well, men are less likely to wear them. As some evidence of this, let’s consider the findings from a new study published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior.
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What Is Sex Like With A “Friend With Benefits?”

“Friends with benefits” (FWBs) are a popular type of sexual relationship these days, with several survey studies of college students finding that about half of them report having had one or more previous FWBs [1]. However, it is important to note that FWBs are by no means limited to college campuses—for instance, Internet research has found men and women in their 50s and 60s reporting experience with these relationships too [2]. As a result of their popularity, one of the questions people often have about FWBs concerns the quality and nature of the sex. Specifically, how does it stack up to the sex one might have in a traditional romantic relationship? A new study published in the Journal of Sex Research provides some answers.
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Should Men Be Circumcised To Reduce STDs And Save On Healthcare Costs?

The debate over male circumcision was revived last month with the publication of two controversial journal articles. First, the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine published an article concluding that if male circumcision rates continue to fall in the U.S. over the next decade, we will end up spending $4.4 billion more on health care due to a projected increase in sexually transmitted infections {1}. The article estimates that fewer circumcisions would result in double digit percentage increases in men infected with HIV, herpes, and the human papillomavirus, as well as corresponding increases in such infections for their (assumed) female partners. Second, the journal Pediatrics published a policy statement on male circumcision in which they concluded that the benefits of the procedure far outweigh the risks {2}. What I would like to do in this post is share my thoughts on circumcision based on my own reading of the science in this area.
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Could Being In A Marginalized Relationship Be Bad For Your Health?

Many people are involved in romantic relationships that are not accepted by their family, friends, or society at large. Sometimes it is because the partners are of the same sex, while other times it is because the partners are of different races or because one partner is much older than the other.  Regardless of why one’s relationship is socially rejected, this bias can have significant implications for the partners involved. For instance, the more relationship disapproval a couple experiences, the more likely they are to break up in the future.1 A brand new study suggests that the effects of romantic disapproval may extend even further than this and could potentially harm couple members' health and well-being.2
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Physician Loses Job After Suggesting Semen Is A Better Valentine’s Day Gift Than Chocolates

Physician Loses Job After Suggesting Semen Is A Better Valentine’s Day Gift Than Chocolates

Yes, you read that headline right. Last year, the president elect of the American College of Surgeons, Dr. Lazar Greenfield, resigned from his position after penning a controversial Valentine’s Day editorial in Surgical News. In his editorial, Greenfield cited a controversial journal article published a decade ago which found that women who did not use condoms reported fewer depressive symptoms than women who practiced safe sex [1]. Based upon these results, some scientists have argued that semen may have antidepressant properties. Greenfield is an apparent believer because he wrote in Surgical News that “there’s a deeper bond between men and women than St Valentine would have suspected, and now we know there’s a better gift for that day than chocolates.” Female surgeons around the world were offended (and rightfully so) at Greenfield’s implication that semen is the best “gift” for women. Most media outlets that covered this story focused only on the sexism embedded in Greenfield’s editorial, but if you’re anything like me, you probably couldn’t help but wonder whether the study Greenfield cited has even a hint of scientific validity. Does it really provide evidence that semen has beneficial effects on women’s psychological well-being? Let's take a closer look at the research.

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Sex Question Friday: How Much Sex is Too Much? Is Female Ejaculation Real? And What Are the Health Risks of Viagra?

Sex Question Friday: How Much Sex is Too Much? Is Female Ejaculation Real? And What Are the Health Risks of Viagra?
Every Friday on the blog, I answer a few burning sex questions submitted to me by actual college students. This week, we’re going to talk about whether it’s possible to have too much sex (to the point where it damages your body), whether female ejaculation really exists, and why guys taking Viagra should be concerned if they experience an erection lasting more than four hours.
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