We Tend To Select Romantic Partners Who Look Like Our Parents

We Tend To Select Romantic Partners Who Look Like Our Parents

Throughout the animal kingdom, scientists have found that early caregiving experiences shape later patterns of sexual attraction.

For example, if you ever took an Introductory Psychology course, you probably learned about Konrad Lorenz’s discovery that baby geese “imprint” on the first moving object they see shortly after birth, meaning they treat that object as if it were their mother and start following it around [1]. Perhaps your textbook even included some adorable photos of Lorenz being trailed by a gaggle of geese that had imprinted on him. However, what’s even more fascinating than this is that, when they grew up, these geese would attempt to mate with human men that physically resembled Lorenz himself—in this case, white dudes with big white beards!

This isn’t a phenomenon unique to geese, though—something similar happens in humans. I know some of you will find this creepy, but humans have a tendency to select romantic partners who physically resemble their childhood caretakers.

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Sex Question Friday: How Many Men And Women Shave Their Pubic Hair?

Sex Question Friday: How Many Men And Women Shave Their Pubic Hair?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a reader who wanted to know more about male and female pubic hair removal practices:

“When did it become common for each gender to begin shaving their pubic hair? I think it started with women, but now it seems just as common among men.”

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Women’s Feelings About Male Body Hair Appear To Change During Ovulation

Women’s Feelings About Male Body Hair Appear To Change During Ovulation

There is a growing body of evidence that what heterosexual women find attractive in men varies across the menstrual cycle. Specifically, when women are at their most fertile (i.e., when they are ovulating), they tend to be attracted to “manlier” men. That is, ovulating women show an exaggerated preference for guys with masculine-looking faces and bodies, deeper voices, and so forth. The prevailing theory is that women are evolutionarily wired to look for partners who have the best genes for making babies. Because masculine physical features are supposedly a sign of a healthy immune system, it is thought that women have developed a preference for manly men when they are at peak fertility with the hope that these superior genes will be passed along to their children. Based upon this reasoning, one might presume that women’s preferences for male body hair would also fluctuate across the menstrual cycle because body hair is typically considered a sign of masculinity. A recent study suggests that women’s body hair preferences do indeed vary according to fertility status, but not in the way that you might expect.

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