Happy K-Day! Celebrating 63 Years Of Scientific Research On Women's Sexuality

Happy K-Day! Celebrating 63 Years Of Scientific Research On Women's Sexuality

Sixty-three years ago this week (August 20, 1953), the media first reported on some of the major findings from Alfred Kinsey's classic book Sexual Behavior in the Human Female.  In case you aren't familiar, this was the first book of its kind to truly explore women's sexual attitudes and behaviors from a scientific perspective.

Kinsey's book sent shockwaves around the world and was quickly dubbed "obscene" by many; however, we now look back upon it as one of the most important publications ever on human sexuality. Kinsey's research was groundbreaking because it debunked numerous myths and misconceptions about women, revealing that they are far more sexual than most people had previously assumed.

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Happy K-Day! Celebrating 62 Years Of Scientific Research On Female Sexuality

Happy K-Day! Celebrating 62 Years Of Scientific Research On Female Sexuality

Sixty-two years ago today (August 20, 1953), the media first reported on the findings of Alfred Kinsey's classic book Sexual Behavior in the Human Female.  It was the first book of its kind to explore women's sexual attitudes and behaviors from a scientific perspective. Although this book initially came as quite a shock to the world and many viewed it as "obscene" at the time, it is now looked upon as one of the most important publications ever on human sexuality. Kinsey's research debunked so many myths and revealed that women are far more sexual than most people had previously assumed. For example, Kinsey found that women were pleasuring themselves, having sex outside of marriage, and engaging in same-sex behaviors. His landmark research showed that men aren't the only ones with sexual needs and desires--women have them too, and they're no less important to study.

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Happy K-Day! Celebrating 61 Years Of Female Sex Research

Happy K-Day! Celebrating 61 Years Of Female Sex Research

Sixty-one years ago today (August 20, 1953), the media first reported on the findings of Alfred Kinsey's classic book Sexual Behavior in the Human Female.  It was the first book of its kind to explore women's sexual attitudes and behaviors from a scientific perspective. While this book initially came as quite a shock to the world and was deemed "obscene" by many, we now look back on it now as one of the most important publications ever on human sexuality because it debunked so many myths and revealed that women are far more sexual than most had previously assumed. For example, Kinsey found that women were pleasuring themselves, they were having sex before marriage, and they were even engaging in same-sex behavior. It turns out that men aren't the only ones with sexual needs and desires. Who knew, right?

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Sex Question Friday: Do Some Women Really Experience Orgasms While Exercising?

Sex Question Friday: Do Some Women Really Experience Orgasms While Exercising?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a reader who was curious about the phenomenon of exercise-induced orgasm among women.

Are "coregasms" real? Is there any research about this?

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How Many Men Today Are Paying For Sex?

How Many Men Today Are Paying For Sex?

Prostitution is sometimes referred to as “the world’s oldest profession” because the sale of sex can be traced back to almost all cultures and societies in recorded history. However, the results of several recent surveys have led some to wonder whether prostitution is becoming a thing of the past because fewer and fewer people are reporting experience buying and selling sex.

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Celebrating 60 Years Of Kinsey's "Sexual Behavior In The Human Female"

Celebrating 60 Years Of Kinsey's "Sexual Behavior In The Human Female"

Sixty years ago today (August 20, 1953), the media first reported on the findings of Alfred Kinsey's classic book Sexual Behavior in the Human Female.  It was the first book of its kind to explore women's sexual attitudes and behaviors from a scientific perspective. Although this book shocked the world at the time and many people considered it to be obscene, we look back on it now as one of the most important publications ever on human sexuality because it debunked numerous myths and revealed that women are much more sexual than previously assumed. For example, Kinsey found that women were masturbating, having sex before marriage, and engaging in same-sex behavior, among other things. Men aren't the only ones with sexual needs and desires? Who knew?

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Nocturnal Orgasms Aren’t Just For Men--Women Have Them Too

Nocturnal Orgasms Aren’t Just For Men--Women Have Them Too

"Masturbation and nocturnal sex dreams to the point of orgasm are the activities which provide the best measure of a female's intrinsic sexuality.” –Alfred Kinsey (1953)

Many people only associate terms such as “nocturnal orgasm” and “wet dream” with men. There are likely several reasons for this. One is the fact that sex education courses typically only discuss male orgasm—female orgasm (nocturnal or otherwise) is usually left out of the discussion completely. In addition, the sexuality narrative in our culture tends to portray male sexuality as more “uncontrollable” than female sexuality. For men, orgasming and ejaculating are seen as occurring almost effortlessly—not only does it happen to guys in their sleep, but during sex it often occurs prematurely. In contrast, the female orgasm is described as something that requires a lot of work and, even then, it’s not guaranteed to happen. However, the notion that nocturnal orgasms are a male phenomenon is patently false. Like female ejaculation, female nocturnal orgasms are an aspect of women’s sexuality that was discovered, described, and then forgotten long ago.

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Do Women Reach Their Sexual “Peak” In Their 30s?

If you’re anything like me, you have probably heard over and over that women reach their sexual peak in their 30s, quite a bit later than men. Naturally, I have always wondered whether there was any truth to this idea. If you Google “women’s sexual peak,” you will come across article after article stating that it is a myth. Most of those articles say that this notion can be attributed to a misreading of Alfred Kinsey’s classic research on female sexuality, which found that women in their 30s reported having the most orgasms compared to women of all other ages. The authors of these articles argue that this higher number of orgasms is not a sign that 30-something women are more desirous of sex; instead, it is argued that these women are probably just more comfortable with their bodies and have figured out more effective ways of reaching orgasm than younger women. However, none of these articles offer any real evidence to back up their contention that the sexual peak idea is a myth. So who should you believe?  
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Sex Question Friday: What Percentage Of Women Reach Orgasm From Intercourse Alone?

Every Friday on the blog, I answer people’s questions about sex, love, and relationships. This week’s question comes from a reader who wanted to know more about the topic of female orgasm:

I often see statistics that indicate 50% of women can't orgasm or 75% can't orgasm from penetration alone. Can you point me to the sources of said statistics and could you explain what exactly "penetration alone" means?

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Sex Question Friday: How Long it Takes to Reach Orgasm, the Sexuality Spectrum, and the Sexual Double Standard

Sex Question Friday: How Long it Takes to Reach Orgasm, the Sexuality Spectrum, and the Sexual Double Standard
Every Friday on the blog, I answer a few burning sex questions submitted to me by actual college students. This week, we’re going to talk about how long it takes men and women to achieve orgasm, whether sexual orientation exists on a continuum, and the societal double standard applied to women who are sexually promiscuous.
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What Percentage of the Population is Gay?

What Percentage of the Population is Gay?
Every semester, students in my Human Sexuality course ask me what percentage of the population is gay or lesbian. Before answering this question, I usually give the class an opportunity to guess. Although this invariably leads to a wide range of responses, the most frequent number that comes up is 10%, and many students who cite this statistic are convinced that it is a fact. But are they right? Probably not. The 10% statistic comes from research conducted by Alfred Kinsey in the 1940s, in which he found that 10% of the men in his sample were gay. However, Kinsey’s participants were not representative of the overall population (for one thing, they were all White and most lived in big cities). He also oversampled from the gay community. Thus, we have to view his findings with a bit of caution. More recent research employing better sampling methods has reliably found that the number of sexual minorities in the population is a bit smaller.
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