We May Be Able to Eradicate HIV Without Ever Finding a Cure For It

We May Be Able to Eradicate HIV Without Ever Finding a Cure For It

We are getting closer and closer to eradicating HIV, a sexually transmitted infection that has contributed to the deaths of at least 32 million people worldwide since the early 1980s. However, something that’s likely to surprise a lot of people is that scientists believe we may be able to eradicate HIV before we ever even find a cure for it. Yep, you read that right.

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What Is The Future Of HIV Treatment? #worldAIDSday

What Is The Future Of HIV Treatment? #worldAIDSday

Today is World AIDS Day, a global public health campaign that began 29 years ago in order to increase HIV/AIDS awareness and education. In support of this campaign, I'm sharing a video created by our friends over at ASAP Science that offers some useful and important information on the subject. Specifically, this video details how HIV affects the body, it discusses why a cure has been so elusive, and it offers a glimpse into the future of HIV treatment. Check it out, and be sure to do your part in contributing to HIV awareness and education by sharing it.

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Video: The Science of HIV/AIDS

Video: The Science of HIV/AIDS

World AIDS Day is a global public health campaign that began 27 years ago and takes place annually on December 1. In support of this campaign, I am sharing the video below created by our friends over at ASAP Science, which offers some useful and important HIV education. This video not only describes how HIV affects the human body, but also why a cure has been so elusive and where the future of HIV treatment is headed. Check it out, and do your part to contribute to HIV awareness and knowledge by sharing it.

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Fact Check: Is the Saliva of an HIV+ Person Really a “Deadly Weapon?”

Fact Check: Is the Saliva of an HIV+ Person Really a “Deadly Weapon?”
It was recently reported in several media outlets that an HIV-positive Texas man was sentenced to 35-years in prison for spitting at a police officer. The reason? Prosecutors argued that because he was infected with HIV, his saliva constituted a “deadly weapon.” Had the man not been infected with the virus, he still would have been prosecuted for his actions, but the sentence would have been far less severe. So was this ruling justified? Is there a strong risk of disease transmission from coming into contact with the saliva of an HIV-positive person?
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